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Santana is Booed for Using Baseball’s Civil Rights Game to Speak Out for Civil Rights

cabell:

“Carlos Santana took the microphone and said that he was representing all immigrants. Then Santana added, “The people of Arizona, and the people of Atlanta, Georgia, you should be ashamed of yourselves.” In a perfect display of Gov. Nathan Deal’s Georgia, the cheers quickly turned to boos. Yes, Carlos Santana was booed on Civil Rights Day in Atlanta for talking about Civil Rights. Then in the press box, Santana held an impromptu press conference where he let loose with an improvised speech to rival one of his virtuoso guitar solos. He said, “This law is not correct. It’s a cruel law, actually, This is about fear. Stop shucking and jiving. People are afraid we’re going to steal your job. No we aren’t. You’re not going to change sheets and clean toilets. I would invite all Latin people to do nothing for about two weeks so you can see who really, really is running the economy. Who cleans the sheets? Who cleans the toilets? Who babysits? I am here to give voice to the invisible.” He went on to say, “Most people at this point they are either afraid to really say what needs to be said, this is the United States the land of the free. If people want the immigration law to keep passing in every state then everybody should get out and just leave the American Indians here. This is about Civil Rights.””

Santana is Booed for Using Baseball’s Civil Rights Game to Speak Out for Civil Rights | The Nation

(via radicallyhottoff)

snaps for Carlos Santana!

(via little-mouth)

Two snaps up in a circle!

From The Angry Black Tumblr | Comment below or Reblog @ Tumblr

1 comment to Santana is Booed for Using Baseball’s Civil Rights Game to Speak Out for Civil Rights

  • Thank goodness for people like Carlos Santana who are off the plantation and able to speak their minds. For decades, he and his band were right there for many benefits and protests.

    Sounds like it’s time to revive Douglas Turner Ward’s play, Day of Absence, a 1963 which documents what happens when blacks take a day off.